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Bayvil

A modest but evocative late Georgian Anglican box with Gothick windows, and a completely intact, single chamber interior. The chief joy is the painted and panelled pulpit and reading desk, the former so tall it almost touches the ceiling with its sounding board.

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Allington

St John the Baptist is listed Grade II and was conveyed to the Friends in 2011 when no other solution could be found. Though it retains some Romanesque fabric, it was largely rebuilt in 19th century by its priest-architect, Father William Grey (1820-72).

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Brithdir

St Mark’s is barely glimpsed from the road, but once you are close, it reveals itself as the single most extraordinary exotic amongst our Welsh holdings. It dates from 1895-8 and is the work of the nationally important architect, Henry Wilson (1864-1934).

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Ballidon

Ballidon All Saints sits in a tightly enclosed churchyard in the middle of a wide, open field. This bucolic setting, in which sheep and cattle graze, is an important archaeological site from the Early-Late Medieval period.

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Barmby-on-the-Marsh

A Grade II listed church that was once set for demolition. A medieval nave, Georgian tower and porches and Victorian chancel … an architectural medley overlooking the cooling towers of Drax power-station.

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Boveney

Medieval Boveney St Mary was built to serve the bargees on the nearby River Thames and retains an atmospheric 18th and 19th century interior with box pews. It has an active group of Local Friends organising events and concerts in the church.

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Eastwell

We own three ancient ‘ruins’ (or ‘Scheduled Ancient Monuments’) and Eastwell St Mary is one of them. Only the 15th century tower and the 19th century chapel remain of the church, with an intriguing memorial to a Richard Plantagenet, supposedly son of Richard III, in the former chancel.