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Friends of Friendless Churches
Friends of Friendless Churches
Celestial lutes and lyres take centre stage on our Christmas cards this year! Sumptuous glass by Powell & Sons at Ynyscynhaearn church, Gwynedd, c1899. A great way to support us and spread the work about our work 💚 #CharityTuesday #stainedglass #art http://bit.ly/2IEWM0U
Friends of Friendless Churches
Friends of Friendless Churches
Woodwalton has clung on through thick and thin - the building is chronically unstable but the community there has remained strong - the church today is a beacon of hope, a hive of community activity - and it lives again. Just take a look at these happy vicars. http://bit.ly/2SWxxfn
Friends of Friendless Churches
Friends of Friendless Churches
Today, at 13th century Woodwalton St Andrew in Cambridgeshire, Local Friends will toll a single tenor bell for six minutes from 11am on 11th November 2018, to commemorate the six men in the village who died. #LestWeForget http://bit.ly/2SWxxfn
Friends of Friendless Churches
Friends of Friendless Churches added 2 new photos.
Two of our churches have events to mark the centenary of #Armistice day. At Mundon St Mary in Essex an exhibition has been organised by local volunteers and remembers in particular one local man who died and was buried in Belgium. David Gentry was baptised at St Mary’s on September 17th 1893 and educated at Mundon Board School. He fell in West Flanders on October 21st 1917 aged just 24. Local relatives still visit the grave and place a cross on the family plot - as Mundon has no war memorial - and the body of their great-great uncle, like hundreds and thousands of servicemen, never made it home. Here are photos of the exhibition and a local volunteer tending his grave. #RemembranceDay2018
http://bit.ly/2SWxxfn
Friends of Friendless Churches
Friends of Friendless Churches
Our connections to the Great War aren’t just confined to memorials and churches erected (or falling). At Ynyscynhaearn in Gwynedd this large cross above the altar was created by artist Emile de Vynck, who fled to Britain with his wife and baby, from Malines in Belgium in 1914 after their town was bombarded. You can read Emile and his fellow artists’ account of their escape and the warm welcome they received in Criccieth on the National Library of Wales website - where the newspaper report is scanned and transcribed. http://bit.ly/2zDMVnX

Emile said: “I left Malines when the Germans bombarded it for the fifth time. Nearly everyone fled the day after the German brutes entered the town. In terror we rushed to another village. A kindly far- mer hid us in his barn and we lay there on the straw. When we woke we escaped to Duffel. and from there to Bruges, where we arrived at midnight and found the town was all in darkness... Every- one gave us food and dainties and when we arrived in London we were taken to St. Giles Home where we stayed four days. Then they sent us down to Criccieth where we have been very kindly received. My wife and I and the baby (Pauline) thank from our hearts the ladies of the Committee for all their kindness to us and also the people of Criccieth. I desire to be excused, being a Fleming, for writing such a short account, but I have done all I can to make myself understood Emile de Vynck. #Belgian" target="_blank">http://bit.ly/2zDMVnX#Belgian #WW1 #refugees #LestWeForget http://bit.ly/2zDMVnX
Friends of Friendless Churches
Friends of Friendless Churches
But while the community at Llandeloy was galvanised to great art, at Urishay in Herefordshire the outbreak of war had the very opposite effect. By the end of the 19th century this 12th castle chapel belonging to the ancient De La Hay family of Urishay Castle had fallen into disrepair. Various uses over the years (notably a blacksmiths forge and a dog kennel!) had taken their toll. With new resolve from the family it was rededicated for worship by the Bishop of Hereford on 29th July 1914 - but the onset of the First World War called a halt to all work and (as at so many hundreds of Britain’s medieval churches) the repair faltered. By 1949 there were gaping holes in the roof, the walls were on the lean and wallpaintings reported in 1914 wore away under exposure to the elements. When we took it into care in 1978 we had to undertake rebuilding the walling to prevent collapse. Here it is today.
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Celestial lutes and lyres take centre stage on our Christmas cards this year! Sumptuous glass by Powell & Sons at Ynyscynhaearn church, Gwynedd, c1899. A great way to support us and spread the work about our work 💚 #CharityTuesday #stainedglass #art https://t.co/62rmDinTzY https://t.co/1wZ6IpQTWG friendschurches photo

Inside Llanfair Kilgeddin today... 🌈 https://t.co/ZySbjslZ7s https://t.co/bqtKFVOyY4
friendschurches photo
Marie Considine @MarieConsidine
In the Usk valley. Sky ready to rain. Feet sink in fallen leaves. Key guarded by muddy dogs. Opened the door to find this summer rainbow. Thanks to @friendschurches and the nearby key holder for conserving this and letting us see it. https://t.co/0QblE74M0T

Part 2 of our reflections on #WW1 and Friendless churches coming up shortly! Have you got your cup of tea ready? #RemembranceDay2018 #100Years #Armistice #cupoftea #FridayFeeling #itsrainingoutside https://t.co/dG1ooH8cON
friendschurches photo
FriendlessChurches @friendschurches
Today we’re reflecting on #WW1 and its impact on our churches; on inspirational art in memory of loved ones lost, the legacy left by artists fleeing war, to churches that simply refuse to be defeated. Here are some of the stories behind the stones... #RemembranceDay2018 https://t.co/L5usFGftWE

You can read all about Emile and his fellow artists and their families account of their escape and the very warm welcome they received in Criccieth - as the newspaper article of 1914 is published (with many more) on the very wonderful @NLWales website https://t.co/PVEGuojJaw https://t.co/eCeoYedcGD friendschurches photo

Today we’re reflecting on #WW1 and its impact on our churches; on inspirational art in memory of loved ones lost, the legacy left by artists fleeing war, to churches that simply refuse to be defeated. Here are some of the stories behind the stones... #RemembranceDay2018 https://t.co/L5usFGftWE friendschurches photo