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Bayvil

A modest but evocative late Georgian Anglican box with Gothick windows, and a completely intact, single chamber interior. The chief joy is the painted and panelled pulpit and reading desk, the former so tall it almost touches the ceiling with its sounding board.

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Hodgeston

Priests at Hodgeston were fortunate in being provided with a finely carved tripartite seat (known as a sedilia) to repose on during the service. But this seat is rather special – it dates from the 14th century, was probably paid for by Bishop Henry de Gower (1328-47), and carved by the same craftsmen he employed at St David’s and Lamphey.

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Llandeloy

A rare example of a surviving Arts and Crafts-influenced church by the architect John Coates Carter, re-invented from fragmentary medieval ruins in 1926-7 and characteristic of the architect’s later work in its use of indigenous materials and identifiably Welsh vernacular motifs.

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Manordeifi

Old St David’s lies on the pilgrimage route to the cathedral of the same dedication and next to the Teifi River. Frequent flooding led to a new church being built on the other side of the river in the 19th century, and its redundancy in the late 20th. Our only church with a coracle!

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Rhoscrowther

Dedicated to St Decumanus and dating from the 14th century, with an unusual plan including 3 chapels. In 1994 the oil refinery behind the church blew up and burned for 36 hours; the village was cleared and with no congregation left it was declared redundant and passed to the Friends in 2005.