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Bayvil

A modest but evocative late Georgian Anglican box with Gothick windows, and a completely intact, single chamber interior. The chief joy is the painted and panelled pulpit and reading desk, the former so tall it almost touches the ceiling with its sounding board.

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Brithdir

St Mark’s is barely glimpsed from the road, but once you are close, it reveals itself as the single most extraordinary exotic amongst our Welsh holdings. It dates from 1895-8 and is the work of the nationally important architect, Henry Wilson (1864-1934).

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Derwen

St Mary’s is famous for two products of the 15th century – the churchyard cross with its intricate biblical sculptures (which we don’t own) and, inside the church (which we do), the medieval rood screen and rare, elaborately panelled, loft above, from where it is believed the priest would have read the gospel during Holy Week.

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Hodgeston

Priests at Hodgeston were fortunate in being provided with a finely carved tripartite seat (known as a sedilia) to repose on during the service. But this seat is rather special – it dates from the 14th century, was probably paid for by Bishop Henry de Gower (1328-47), and carved by the same craftsmen he employed at St David’s and Lamphey.

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Llanbeulan

Standing in isolation at the end of its raised grassy causeway, and said to have been founded by St Peulan himself in the 6th century, Llanbeulan church dates from the 12th century and retains a rectangular Norman stone font of great significance – and much scholarly debate.

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Llandawke

Llandawke St Odoceus was rescued from dereliction in 2006 and is found just off the tourist trail – a short drive from Laugharne, home of Dylan Thomas, with many fine beaches, castles, and picturesque walks nearby.

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Llandeloy

A rare example of a surviving Arts and Crafts-influenced church by the architect John Coates Carter, re-invented from fragmentary medieval ruins in 1926-7 and characteristic of the architect’s later work in its use of indigenous materials and identifiably Welsh vernacular motifs.

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Llanelieu

The rare medieval rood screen at Llanelieu, on which you can still see the ghostly outline of the cross removed at the Reformation, is much admired by visitors and architectural historians alike. But did you know it also features in Andy McNab?

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Llanfaglan

A fascinating medieval church in a picturesque setting overlooking Caernarfon Bay, St Baglan’s has pre-Christian origins – evident both in its large churchyard and early inscribed stones set in the doorway – and an evocative 18th century interior.

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Llanfair Kilgeddin

Made special by its interior, medieval St Mary’s retains a complete circuit of 19th century scraffito decoration by Heywood Sumner, depicting the Benedictine – it is unique in Wales and listed Grade I. The architect for the 19th century rebuilding was John Dando Sedding.