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Milland

Old St Luke, which sits in the same churchyard as the Victorian church that replaced it, was one of our very first vestings in 1974. It has survived against the odds, not least because it is one of the most loved of all our churches – with an active group of Local Friends.

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Llanfrothen

A single-cell, medieval interior dominated by its 15th century cusped and braced roof. Notable for its connection with David Lloyd George who championed the right of a Non-conformist to be buried there in 1888, and Clough Williams-Ellis, whose family seat is nearby and who knew and loved the church.

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Mundon

St Mary’s was in a sorry state when the Friends took it on in 1975 , and chronic movement has led to severe cracking in the nave and chancel. We have carried out an extensive programme of underpinning and conserved the fragile mural paintings in the nave.

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Llangeview

Constructed in the distinctive Old Red Sandstone of Monmouthshire, and sitting in a near-circular ancient churchyard, the stonework of St David’s tells many stories of alteration and infilling. The interior was untouched by the Victorians, and the medieval rood loft survives.

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Saltfleetby

Church-moving is rare, but the residual tower of St Peter’s is all that remains of just such an exercise carried out in 1877. Partly because it was in the wrong positon, partly because it had started to move (the tower is still on a definite lean).

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Llantrisant

Accessible only by foot, off a remote country road, Llantrisant dates from the 14th century, and is surrounded by a boundary wall so high it feels defensive. Maybe it is this sense of mystery that makes it one of the most remote but at the same time one of the most visited of all our churches.

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South Huish

At St Andrew’s everything is roofless – as it has been since 1866 when a window was blown in during divine service. But this doesn’t stop this Grade II* church being used each August for an annual service held by local people.

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Spernall

St Leonards is a classic village church – double-cell with a tall, narrow nave of almost Anglo-Saxon proportions and a doll-like chancel rebuilt in Neo-Norman by an unknown hand in 1844. Closed and proposed for demolition in the 1970’s, now in use as an artists’ workshop.

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Meline

St Dogfael’s church, Meline is an exercise in High Victorian geometry with “minimal extraneous detail”. The church was built by Robert Jewell Withers in 1864 for Gothic romanticist Sir Thomas …

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Penmorfa

The clue that you have arrived at St Beuno’s is the gloriously organic lychgate in slate, reconstructed in the 19th century but originally dated 1698. This structure alone testifies to the geological richness of the site, an elevated oval churchyard with monuments of all forms and status.