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Allington

St John the Baptist is listed Grade II and was conveyed to the Friends in 2011 when no other solution could be found. Though it retains some Romanesque fabric, it was largely rebuilt in 19th century by its priest-architect, Father William Grey (1820-72).

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Brownshill

St Mary of the Angels is our first Roman Catholic church, and, as it was only completed in 1937, it is also our most modern vesting. Designed by WD Caroe at the end of his career, Brownshill has passed to us through the determination of local people to save it.

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Eastwell

We own three ancient ‘ruins’ (or ‘Scheduled Ancient Monuments’) and Eastwell St Mary is one of them. Only the 15th century tower and the 19th century chapel remain of the church, with an intriguing memorial to a Richard Plantagenet, supposedly son of Richard III, in the former chancel.

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Llandawke

Llandawke St Odoceus was rescued from dereliction in 2006 and is found just off the tourist trail – a short drive from Laugharne, home of Dylan Thomas, with many fine beaches, castles, and picturesque walks nearby.

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Llandeloy

A rare example of a surviving Arts and Crafts-influenced church by the architect John Coates Carter, re-invented from fragmentary medieval ruins in 1926-7 and characteristic of the architect’s later work in its use of indigenous materials and identifiably Welsh vernacular motifs.

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Lightcliffe

This residual tower of 1775 is all that remains of the church after it fell into decay in the 1960’s following serious storm damage. We are thrilled that the Friends of Lightcliffe not only care for the vast churchyard, but have catalogued all 11,000 burials online.

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Llanfaglan

A fascinating medieval church in a picturesque setting overlooking Caernarfon Bay, St Baglan’s has pre-Christian origins – evident both in its large churchyard and early inscribed stones set in the doorway – and an evocative 18th century interior.

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Llanfigael

St Figael (St Migael) would not be here now but for the Reverend Edgar Jones. Edgar adopted the building when it closed and saw it through the thick and thin of Welsh weather before we were able to take it into permanent care in 2007.

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Milland

Old St Luke, which sits in the same churchyard as the Victorian church that replaced it, was one of our very first vestings in 1974. It has survived against the odds, not least because it is one of the most loved of all our churches – with an active group of Local Friends.

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Penmorfa

The clue that you have arrived at St Beuno’s is the gloriously organic lychgate in slate, reconstructed in the 19th century but originally dated 1698. This structure alone testifies to the geological richness of the site, an elevated oval churchyard with monuments of all forms and status.