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Bayvil

A modest but evocative late Georgian Anglican box with Gothick windows, and a completely intact, single chamber interior. The chief joy is the painted and panelled pulpit and reading desk, the former so tall it almost touches the ceiling with its sounding board.

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Hodgeston

Priests at Hodgeston were fortunate in being provided with a finely carved tripartite seat (known as a sedilia) to repose on during the service. But this seat is rather special – it dates from the 14th century, was probably paid for by Bishop Henry de Gower (1328-47), and carved by the same craftsmen he employed at St David’s and Lamphey.

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Caldecote

The remnant of a medieval village, in soft clunch and dating from the 14th and 15th centuries – Caldecote retains an elaborate canopied stoup, a fine font, and is host to a Fuchsia Festival each Summer.

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East Hatley

Earliest fabric 1217, reused medieval stonework, important 17th century cartouche to Downing family in S porch (founders of Downing College, Cambs). Most of extant work is that of 19th C …

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Fordham

St Mary used to be a wayside church, hugging the edge of the Great Cambridge Road until this was diverted. It is now a well-kept secret – the only sign leading to it reading simply ‘Byroad’. It passed to us after the heroic group that took it on when it closed sought a long-term solution.

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Matlock Bath

Dismayed by the ‘Low churchmanship’ of the nearby parish church, Mrs Louisa Harris decided to erect her own private chapel, and assembled a glittering array of artists to execute it. Architect: Sir Guy Dawber. Date: 1897.

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Llanfihangel Rogiet

One of our newest vestings in Wales, St Michael is late medieval in origin and notable for its two rather battered effigies – one to Ann Martel who died in 1270, with a greyhound at her feet, and the other, supposed to be her husband, John, in chainmail with his sword and tunic.

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Llantrisant

Accessible only by foot, off a remote country road, Llantrisant dates from the 14th century, and is surrounded by a boundary wall so high it feels defensive. Maybe it is this sense of mystery that makes it one of the most remote but at the same time one of the most visited of all our churches.

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South Huish

At St Andrew’s everything is roofless – as it has been since 1866 when a window was blown in during divine service. But this doesn’t stop this Grade II* church being used each August for an annual service held by local people.

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Manordeifi

Old St David’s lies on the pilgrimage route to the cathedral of the same dedication and next to the Teifi River. Frequent flooding led to a new church being built on the other side of the river in the 19th century, and its redundancy in the late 20th. Our only church with a coracle!