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Llancillo

The tiny little church at Llancillo, vested with us in 2007, is probably the most difficult of all our buildings to find – but the search is worth it. The key hangs in the porch but the door is only locked to keep out the sheep.

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Llanfigael

St Figael (St Migael) would not be here now but for the Reverend Edgar Jones. Edgar adopted the building when it closed and saw it through the thick and thin of Welsh weather before we were able to take it into permanent care in 2007.

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Llanfrothen

A single-cell, medieval interior dominated by its 15th century cusped and braced roof. Notable for its connection with David Lloyd George who championed the right of a Non-conformist to be buried there in 1888, and Clough Williams-Ellis, whose family seat is nearby and who knew and loved the church.

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Llangeview

Constructed in the distinctive Old Red Sandstone of Monmouthshire, and sitting in a near-circular ancient churchyard, the stonework of St David’s tells many stories of alteration and infilling. The interior was untouched by the Victorians, and the medieval rood loft survives.

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Papworth St Agnes

There has been a church on the site of St John the Baptist for nearly a thousand years, but the distinctive chequerboard design of clunch (limestone) and knapped flint you see today was a rebuilding of 1852-4 by the Ecclesiologist JH Sperling.

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Llantrisant

Accessible only by foot, off a remote country road, Llantrisant dates from the 14th century, and is surrounded by a boundary wall so high it feels defensive. Maybe it is this sense of mystery that makes it one of the most remote but at the same time one of the most visited of all our churches.

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Manordeifi

Old St David’s lies on the pilgrimage route to the cathedral of the same dedication and next to the Teifi River. Frequent flooding led to a new church being built on the other side of the river in the 19th century, and its redundancy in the late 20th. Our only church with a coracle!

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Penllech

Located on the Llyn Peninsula, looking out to the Irish Sea, Penllech, which means ‘end of the rock’ or ‘head-stone’, was vested with us in 2009 and is medieval in origin, rebuilt by Samuel Jones in 1840.

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Sutterby

For a tiny and once very forlorn church, St John the Baptist is now a hive of activity – with volunteer local friends organizing everything from a corn dolly workshop, to medieval music, to hedge-laying, to an exploration of English font stones. The ‘Spirit of Sutterby’ is an exemplar project bringing the community together.

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Waddesdon Hill

This remarkable Strict and Particular Baptist Chapel was founded in 1792 by Francis Cox and vested in our care over 20 years ago following its closure. We saved the chapel from a conversion which would have destroyed much of its historic character inside – including a total immersion baptistery.