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Fordham

St Mary used to be a wayside church, hugging the edge of the Great Cambridge Road until this was diverted. It is now a well-kept secret – the only sign leading to it reading simply ‘Byroad’. It passed to us after the heroic group that took it on when it closed sought a long-term solution.

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Llanfaglan

A fascinating medieval church in a picturesque setting overlooking Caernarfon Bay, St Baglan’s has pre-Christian origins – evident both in its large churchyard and early inscribed stones set in the doorway – and an evocative 18th century interior.

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Llancillo

The tiny little church at Llancillo, vested with us in 2007, is probably the most difficult of all our buildings to find – but the search is worth it. The key hangs in the porch but the door is only locked to keep out the sheep.

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Long Crichel

St Mary’s is both peculiar and picturesque. Set in to the chalkland of the Cranborne Chase, the design combines a late medieval tower with a nave, transept and apse built …

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Llanfigael

St Figael (St Migael) would not be here now but for the Reverend Edgar Jones. Edgar adopted the building when it closed and saw it through the thick and thin of Welsh weather before we were able to take it into permanent care in 2007.

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Llanfrothen

A single-cell, medieval interior dominated by its 15th century cusped and braced roof. Notable for its connection with David Lloyd George who championed the right of a Non-conformist to be buried there in 1888, and Clough Williams-Ellis, whose family seat is nearby and who knew and loved the church.

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Llangeview

Constructed in the distinctive Old Red Sandstone of Monmouthshire, and sitting in a near-circular ancient churchyard, the stonework of St David’s tells many stories of alteration and infilling. The interior was untouched by the Victorians, and the medieval rood loft survives.

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Papworth St Agnes

There has been a church on the site of St John the Baptist for nearly a thousand years, but the distinctive chequerboard design of clunch (limestone) and knapped flint you see today was a rebuilding of 1852-4 by the Ecclesiologist JH Sperling.

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Llantrisant

Accessible only by foot, off a remote country road, Llantrisant dates from the 14th century, and is surrounded by a boundary wall so high it feels defensive. Maybe it is this sense of mystery that makes it one of the most remote but at the same time one of the most visited of all our churches.

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Manordeifi

Old St David’s lies on the pilgrimage route to the cathedral of the same dedication and next to the Teifi River. Frequent flooding led to a new church being built on the other side of the river in the 19th century, and its redundancy in the late 20th. Our only church with a coracle!