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Allington

St John the Baptist is listed Grade II and was conveyed to the Friends in 2011 when no other solution could be found. Though it retains some Romanesque fabric, it was largely rebuilt in 19th century by its priest-architect, Father William Grey (1820-72).

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Ayshford

A Grade I listed 15th century former private chapel with a salmon pink interior and fine monuments to the Ayshford family. Approached via private farmland – take care not to shut inquisitive sheep in the church!

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Boveney

Medieval Boveney St Mary was built to serve the bargees on the nearby River Thames and retains an atmospheric 18th and 19th century interior with box pews. It has an active group of Local Friends organising events and concerts in the church.

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Brownshill

St Mary of the Angels is our first Roman Catholic church, and, as it was only completed in 1937, it is also our most modern vesting. Designed by WD Caroe at the end of his career, Brownshill has passed to us through the determination of local people to save it.

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Caldecote

The remnant of a medieval village, in soft clunch and dating from the 14th and 15th centuries – Caldecote retains an elaborate canopied stoup, a fine font, and is host to a Fuchsia Festival each Summer.

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Eastwell

We own three ancient ‘ruins’ (or ‘Scheduled Ancient Monuments’) and Eastwell St Mary is one of them. Only the 15th century tower and the 19th century chapel remain of the church, with an intriguing memorial to a Richard Plantagenet, supposedly son of Richard III, in the former chancel.

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Fordham

St Mary used to be a wayside church, hugging the edge of the Great Cambridge Road until this was diverted. It is now a well-kept secret – the only sign leading to it reading simply ‘Byroad’. It passed to us after the heroic group that took it on when it closed sought a long-term solution.

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Hardmead

St Mary’s is listed Grade I and was taken into care by the Friends in 1982 after the church authorities had proposed converting it into a house. It retains a fascinating series of monuments to the Catesby and Sheddon families.

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Lightcliffe

This residual tower of 1775 is all that remains of the church after it fell into decay in the 1960’s following serious storm damage. We are thrilled that the Friends of Lightcliffe not only care for the vast churchyard, but have catalogued all 11,000 burials online.

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Llancillo

The tiny little church at Llancillo, vested with us in 2007, is probably the most difficult of all our buildings to find – but the search is worth it. The key hangs in the porch but the door is only locked to keep out the sheep.