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Llancillo

The tiny little church at Llancillo, vested with us in 2007, is probably the most difficult of all our buildings to find – but the search is worth it. The key hangs in the porch but the door is only locked to keep out the sheep.

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Long Crichel

St Mary’s is both peculiar and picturesque. Set in to the chalkland of the Cranborne Chase, the design combines a late medieval tower with a nave, transept and apse built …

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Matlock Bath

Dismayed by the ‘Low churchmanship’ of the nearby parish church, Mrs Louisa Harris decided to erect her own private chapel, and assembled a glittering array of artists to execute it. Architect: Sir Guy Dawber. Date: 1897.

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Milland

Old St Luke, which sits in the same churchyard as the Victorian church that replaced it, was one of our very first vestings in 1974. It has survived against the odds, not least because it is one of the most loved of all our churches – with an active group of Local Friends.

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Papworth St Agnes

There has been a church on the site of St John the Baptist for nearly a thousand years, but the distinctive chequerboard design of clunch (limestone) and knapped flint you see today was a rebuilding of 1852-4 by the Ecclesiologist JH Sperling.

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Spernall

St Leonards is a classic village church – double-cell with a tall, narrow nave of almost Anglo-Saxon proportions and a doll-like chancel rebuilt in Neo-Norman by an unknown hand in 1844. Closed and proposed for demolition in the 1970’s, now in use as an artists’ workshop.

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Penllech

Located on the Llyn Peninsula, looking out to the Irish Sea, Penllech, which means ‘end of the rock’ or ‘head-stone’, was vested with us in 2009 and is medieval in origin, rebuilt by Samuel Jones in 1840.

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Penmorfa

The clue that you have arrived at St Beuno’s is the gloriously organic lychgate in slate, reconstructed in the 19th century but originally dated 1698. This structure alone testifies to the geological richness of the site, an elevated oval churchyard with monuments of all forms and status.

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Tremaen

Designed by ‘Wales’ first architect’ John Jones and of the first churches in the county built according to the principles of the Ecclesiological Society; preaching the ‘virtues’ of the Gothic style – with deep chancels to concentrate the mind on the altar and a prime location by the entrance into the interior for the font.

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Wood Walton

An ancient and beautiful church glimpsed each day by hundreds of commuters on the East Coast Mainline in Cambridgeshire – and blessed with a very committed and energetic group of Local Friends.